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Join us in an innovation journey and help us crack solutions for early intervention of Alzheimers!

THE ALZHEIMER’S CHALLENGE

How can we help people with signs of Alzheimer's, to overcome denial and seek medical help?

Read more +

Alzheimer’s disease may well be humanity’s biggest challenge.​ It shows a profound unmet need for patients, caregivers, and societies.
Global dementia prevalence will triple between today's 47 million to 132 million in 2050. The number of people over 65 will nearly double between 2000 and 2030 in the western world. Alzheimer's disease accounts for 60-80% of all dementia and will become a leading cause of death in many developed countries in the next ten years.
The clinical and economic burden is accompanied by a humanistic burden. Alzheimer’s Disease gradually erodes an individual’s ability to remember, communicate, eat, walk and interact with the world, inflicting a huge burden on patients as well as their families and caregivers. This burden is one that all of society must shoulder, forcing health and social care systems, employers and the broader economy to assume unprecedented—and unsustainable—costs and risks to manage the Alzheimer's crisis
We know today that Alzheimer’s Disease is not part of normal aging. Alzheimer's is more than memory loss, involving progressive loss of autonomy, functional decline, behavioral disturbance and dependence on caregivers and nursing care. Of the people living with Alzheimer's - less than half have been diagnosed. ​Of those who suffer symptoms or are diagnosed, many feel stigmatized.
Denial is a common reaction.​ It prevents patients and caregivers from engaging with the healthcare system, pre-diagnosis and post-diagnosis. Denial prevents patients to conduct an evaluation OR seek medical help. Denial prevents caregivers from motivating patients to seek a diagnosis. Patients with denial lose trust and feel like they are being ‘set up to fail’ along the diagnosis path
A lack of understanding of disease progression and inability to understand if medication is effective, or not, enhance patient and caregiver denial and lack of compliance.
We want to explore this topic of denial in dementia patients and caregivers, with a design challenge. It will involve a crowdsourcing-design thinking campaign, open to the public.
A collaborative innovation journey where everyone is invited.

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Understand

Understanding the challenge

Now starts an inspiring phase of discovery and research! By soaking up information and gaining empathy for users, you are truly expansive, tapping into the unknown with open arms and senses. Important for this part is to be as unbiased and as open-minded as possible to allow unforeseeable insights to surface. You’ll never know before where your insights might guide you. After having gathered your findings you will start making sense of it all.

Learn more +

Objectives​

• Gain insights about the challenge to guide your further work
• Get to know and gain empathy for users (patient, closely related, caregivers or other that circles our main user)
• Uncover user-needs, fears and hopes, drivers behind denial, behaviors and motivations
• Expand your knowledge and challenge your perspective
• Identify work-arounds - ways in which users deal with a given problem
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Full instructions


Design Thinking guide

Persona: Bill & Damian

This is a story about Bill, a retired musician. He is diagnosed, under treatment and get’s nursing help at at home. His later state of A’s has worsened and his form of denial (lack of awareness) makes his son Damian concerned about how to handle him...


Persona: Steve

This is a story about Steve, a hard working sharp man with memory problems. He is in denial as his symptoms (and what they might mean...) doesn’t go together att all with his self image...


Persona: Liz & Karen

This is a story about Liz, a retired teacher. She is showing early signs of Alzheimer’s but is not yet diagnosed. She is in denial but her symptoms are starting to make her daughter Karen worried...​


Read a story - Alzheimer’s and the Devil Called Denial

Alzheimer’s is, above all, an insidious disease. Its symptoms often begin so mildly and progress so slowly that it’s easy for friends and loved ones to deny them until one day there’s a ‘defining incident.

Read the whole story >>

Watch a movie

A linguistics professor and her family find their bonds tested when she is diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease.

Read more >>

Read a book - "Slow Dancing With A Stranger" by Meryl Comer

From Emmy award-winning broadcast journalist and leading Alzheimer’s advocate, Meryl Comer comes a profoundly intimate and unflinching account of her husband’s battle with Alzheimer’s disease.

Watch a clip >>
Or learn more from Meryls website >>

The Alzheimers Challenge

Alzheimer’s disease may well be humanity’s biggest challenge.​ It shows a profound unmet need for patients, caregivers, and societies.

Global dementia prevalence will triple between today's 47 million to 132 million in 2050. The number of people over 65 will nearly double between 2000 and 2030 in the western world. Alzheimer's disease accounts for 60-80% of all dementia and will become a leading cause of death in many developed countries in the next ten years.

The clinical and economic burden is accompanied by a humanistic burden. Alzheimer’s Disease gradually erodes an individual’s ability to remember, communicate, eat, walk and interact with the world, inflicting a huge burden on patients as well as their families and caregivers. This burden is one that all of society must shoulder, forcing health and social care systems, employers and the broader economy to assume unprecedented—and unsustainable—costs and risks to manage the Alzheimer's crisis

We know today that Alzheimer’s Disease is not part of normal aging. Alzheimer's is more than memory loss, involving progressive loss of autonomy, functional decline, behavioral disturbance and dependence on caregivers and nursing care. Of the people living with Alzheimer's - less than half have been diagnosed. ​Of those who suffer symptoms or are diagnosed, many feel stigmatized.

Denial is a common reaction.​ It prevents patients and caregivers from engaging with the healthcare system, pre-diagnosis and post-diagnosis. Denial prevents patients to conduct an evaluation OR seek medical help. Denial prevents caregivers from motivating patients to seek a diagnosis. Patients with denial lose trust and feel like they are being ‘set up to fail’ along the diagnosis path

A lack of understanding of disease progression and inability to understand if medication is effective, or not, enhance patient and caregiver denial and lack of compliance.

We want to explore this topic of denial in dementia patients and caregivers, with a design challenge. It will involve a crowdsourcing-design thinking campaign, open to the public.

A collaborative innovation journey where everyone is invited.

Ideate

Start ideation

Now starts the exciting phase of ideation! This is all about sparking off as many ideas as possible, exploring the solution space to the problem that was defined in the previous phase. Start to ideate and build on each other! For this phase switch your mindset to: everything is possible! Be visual when you communicate your ideas!

The innovation process lives through your active participation. Share your ideas below and engage by leaving comments and build on each other. This is open innovation!

Learn more +

Objectives​

• Ask the right questions so to help you innovate
• Brainstorming
- explore as many solutions as possible
- step beyond the obvious solutions
• Be visual - make your ideas tangible by drawing or building simple rough prototypes
• Build on each other’s ideas
• Evaluate and choose which ideas to develop further
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Full instructions


Design Thinking guide

Anonymous testing for Alzheimer’s to remove stigma

This proposal is about anonymous testing for early detection of Alzheimer’s disease.

This will allow to remove stigma and fears and empower oneself with a diagnosis to implement the right life style changes for brain health.

11

Geras Solutions

Geras Solutions has a very clear mission – to transform the lives of those impacted by dementia. We make this a reality by providing our digital solutions – Geras Clinic, Geras Support and Risk Reduction (which will use AI and Machine learning processes interpreted by specialists) to guarantee dementia support that is clinically tested and validated.

Risk Reduction: based on years of research incorporated in a digital tracking tool.
Geras Clinic: evidence-based standard test and video chat with doctors/nurses.
Geras Support: disease management support and video chat.

10

Smart phone recognizes symptoms

What if your smart phone recognizes your symptoms through your everyday activities.

Habits/routines you often perform or that are necessities on your phones could be used to read patterns. It could be the text message app that recognizes your inability to write as fast as you normally do, your the code reader to open your phone that recognizes that you are either slower than normal or need several attempts to do something that you normally do not need to do several times.

But what would the result be? How can the phone encourage the user to seek medical help?

4

Follow-up with "support group" after diagnosis

• Why is it needed?
After the patient has been diagnosed, a void occurs where patients and relatives themselves must seek information and appropriate help.

• How does it work?
All patients diagnosed are called for follow-up meetings with a "support group" consisting of physicians, specialist nurse, curator, nutritionist, physiotherapist and aid attendant. First meeting with specialist nurse to chart how much the patient / relatives know about the disease and how the patient's social network looks. Also time for patient reflection and questions. Thereafter an individual plan can be designed where the help needed can be obtained from the "support group". In Sweden, we already have "minnesmottagningar" with the above features but they are not found anywhere in the country and the patient must ask his doctor for referral (which is troublesome if the are in the denial phase).


• What is the essence of your idea? Which function is vital to it?
The essence is to build an infrastructure around the patient. Caregivers need to work in new ways.

3

Solution oriented mindset to first symptoms

Media campaign with objective to get people with dementia symptoms to see a doctor by communicating that memory loss and other symptoms are not necessarily dementia and there is often a treatment or change in lifestyle that will have a positive impact. With early examination the chance of effective treatment increases.

1

Raise awareness like RAMLÖSA

Do you remember Ramlösa’s very personal bottles like ”BUSIG”, ”PIGG”? Can we make AD less dramatic and make patents and their relatives more keen to seek help by reminding of AD to the broader audeince by using eg Ramlösa ”GLÖMSK”, ”FÖRVIRRAD” etc? Who could be partners except from Ramlösa? Arla?

4

Inclusive meeting points

Creating meeting points (spaces, occasions) for seniors, where they could meet people in early stages of dementia and meaningfully engage in a pleasant pastime - e.g. playing games, organizing local fairs, doing sports together. In that space people with dementia would be active participants in creating a common value (not showcase examples!) - perhaps also to the benefit of the larger local comunity, e.g. by organizing an event open to the public.

Engaging dementia advocates who live with a dementia disease helps to fight fear and stigma as well as raises awareness of the problem.

Benefits for seniors with probable dementia:
- overcoming denial
- understanding there is a possibility to lead a good life even after the diagnosis
- offering a community/support to interact.

Benefits for seniors with diagnosed dementia:
- engaging in a meaningful activity
- inclusion in the society
- offering a community/support to interact.

5

Built in message from phone

Just as you get a weekly reminder on your phone informing you of your screen time the phone recognizes how your behaviour changes over time - indicating that you should visit your physician. This should be built into the software of the phone and not through an app meaning that also those in denial get this info without searching for it.

5

Open Café

People are invited to our fun café where they can play and relax for free. After accepting they get monitored on their patterns and behaviors. This open space attract more and more people. In the café they find information about treatment options.

The idea with our café is a fun way to getting early connection with potential patients and track their habits and find early patterns for disease progression.

4

Memory app: ’You can’t have all in your head’

This is an app that supports you with keeping track of things. Anyone can benefit from it and you might use it even before the symptoms of Alzheimer arise.

1. Remember things and how they are connected:
Do you Google the same things very often? The app will keep track of it and gather the information you often search for in different cathegories. It helps you organizing your world.

2. It would also remember names of friends and family members based on e.g pictures in social media of the family member or friend and when they are around you will get a popup who it is and how you are connected when you dont know.

3. If you Google the same things very often or check names of your friends/family very often the app will begin informant you about it- givning statistics. It might be that you are stressad during a short time but if it goes on for a longer time it will encourage you to seek early medical support.

3

More and better nursing homes/retirement homes

There is a very large unmet need for more and better nursing homes/retirement homes for people suffering from AD.

Wouldn't it be fantastic if the patients had several options on where they could move and when? The nursing homes should be specialized and have different themes depending on the interests (music, culture, nature, fine wines etc) that their residents have and have had since a very long time.

The quality of the nursing homes should be great and to move there should be easy (no queue).

By remodelling the nursing home structure which is present today and make it more attractive and available, the AD patients should not have to live with their spouse until the situation has very negative effects on both their lives.

If the AD patients could move to a nursing home before the disease gets too severe, the spouse should be able to work and live longer and by doing that they would contribute in a positive way to the economy in the society.

2

Braintrack - prognostic gaming

Braintrack prognostic gaming is a screening app for dementia that includes brain health training games. The idea is to create an app that is fun, exciting and that keeps you up to date on recent brain health training while it also screens you for dementia. This would allow physicians to screen a population for early signs of dementia without deterring them from using a right out cognitive/dementia app.

How can we get people to overcome denial and seek medical help in the early phase of AD?

We believe that the only way to overcome denial and seek medical help early is through early screening and direct contact with a GP. The screening is more likely to be collected successfully within an app that also includes advice, games and information about how one could work on reducing some of the risk factors for dementia for instance by having an active lifestyle, an active social life, promoting cardiovascular health, brain trying, healthy diet etc.

How can we get people to use such an app?
We believe that the only way to make a cognitive screening app intriguing is by combining it with brain health training, an area that is quickly developing. Therefore, our app Braintrack – prognostic gaming, would combine brain training games and lifestyle interventions with cognitive screening on a 6-month interval. The app would also include push notifications and reminders that could for instance help you stay fit, eat well, stay mindful, be social, maintain good cardiovascular health, be mindful etc, all to reduce the risk of AD.

What measures could we include in the screening?
The cognitive/testing battery needs to be extensive and we suggest a full battery done on a 6 month basis including but not limited to: subjective memory decline, episodic memory, mmse, depression, apathy, lifestyle factors. When there is a decrease on more than 2 measures or parameters there is a direct alert to your GP. There is also of course the potential to combine these with voluntary health screens at your GP, blood pressure, inflammatory markers, cholesterol, genetics etc.


How can we get people to come in for a checkup?
By having a direct link to your GP he/she could receive a message once a patient falls under a certain threshold, for example bad performance on 2 or more tests or worse performance on 2 or more tests in comparison to previous testing. The opportunity to do longitudinal individual follow ups within this app would allow for a great screening tool. Once a patient falls below certain criteria the GP contacts the patient to set up an app.. The GP can also combine information from the app with up to date information on Blood pressure, cholesterol, inflammatory markers etc.

How can we create something that’s fun that people would actually use?
The potential for people to return to the app would allow for longitudinal screening and inter individual change maps that could pinpoint individuals at risk for developing dementia and thereby receiving help early. For such an app to succeed in would need to be used by a lot of people and people would need to return to the app. Therefore the focus of the app should really be on developing something that’s fun, exciting, up to date on exercise and other lifestyle interventions and brain health training games so that people already from 45 years of age get into using it, and using it often.

2

Team up

Team up!

Pick an idea to develop further and try to team up with others, either through this platform or with peers around you. In Design Thinking, collaboration is a core principle, by collaborating you will reach further! If you can't find a fellow innovator, you can create a team with just you in it.


Full instructions


Design Thinking guide

  • The True Stories

    Join the True Stories team and help to fight the stigma of dementia by showing real-world examples of people living with the condition - and living well. A media campaign that would show stories of real people living with dementia and their relatives, including stories where people got closer togather when one of them developed dementia (there are such!) or when people discovered new meaning in life when they had received a dementia diagnosis. Let's show the world that a dementia diagnosis is not a death sentence!

  • The Experience Room - X-line

    Cross this line of silent ignorance, prejudices and uneasiness. Get an insight what it means to have Alzheimer’s disease - EXPERIENCE it. With help of AR (augmented reality) we will develop a room, which is adaptable to your own home. Be guided through different story-lines, full filling tasks and start feeling the different phases of Alzheimer´s disease. Due to this deeper understanding, you will be encourage to talk about it with your loved ones, sharing information and beeing more aware.

  • RDI Team 7

    From our ideation session in Switzerland, we came up with the idea of engaging a celebrity "face" to talk about AD and the advantages of not postponing seeking medical advise. Also, support authors that come up with scripts for making a tasteful "krimi" or comedy movie to reach a different audience than those that would watch dramas (such as Still Alice) to further expose the public to AD and importantly, what can be done to help.

  • RDI Team 1

    Team 1 from our ideation session in Switzerland proposed creating awareness with the younger generation, esp. through social media. We need to move the younger generation into prevention modus and knowledge that catching it early means better chance of not progressing.

  • RDI Team 3

    Team 3 of the ideation workshop in Switzerland came up with focus on awareness and making sure there's a source for help, eg an anonymous hotline where people can call if they are concerned or need help. they suggested the "blue ribbon" campaign (in the style of the pink ribbon for breast cancer or red for AIDs)

  • RDI Team 5

    Team 5 from the ideation workshop in Switzerland proposes a prevention tool/app, which provides the following services: 1) longitudinal assessment of risk 2) proactive lifestyle stimulation 3) social/family network platform 4) insurance company participation 5) patient support 6) integration with OS the aim is to address the denial, stigma, fear, chronicity of disease, challenges from symptoms and dealing with aging in general.

  • RDI Team 8

    From our ideation session in Switzerland, Team 8 came up with the idea to help make AD care centers less a scary "bad place" a patient could end up because of the disease, but more seen as a protected environment for part of the community that cannot take care of themselves, eg like a child-care center. So instead of just submitting the patient, the family gets place and just as with child-care, there is a long initiation period so the patient can ease into the stay there.

  • RDI Team 4b

    From our ideation session in Switzerland, we think it is (also) important that all AD associations lobby their health policy makers to get AD screening as part of the regular physical check-ups for people over 50. A cognitive test should be integrated into the routine check-ups so people don't wait until symptoms are so life-disturbing, before seeking help. Payers can incentivise "healthy behaviour", eg like sponsoring fitbit trackers, etc.

  • RDI Team 7

    From our ideation session in Switzerland, we came up with the idea of engaging a celebrity "face" to talk about AD and the advantages of not postponing seeking medical advise. Also, support authors that come up with scripts for making a tasteful "krimi" or comedy movie to reach a different audience than those that would watch dramas (such as Still Alice) to further expose the public to AD and importantly, what can be done to help.

  • RDI Team 4

    We ran an onsite ideation session in Switzerland and generated ideas that focus on removing stigma, eg by creating a "fun family challenge across generations" game, in the style of board games or on-line multi-player video games. The game can be part of the awareness program linked to local AD associations. The game should share information to entire family through a gamified environment on 1) what can be done to prevent dementia development 2) slow down the disease, or 3) what needs to be plan appropriately to ease the transition into care-center if it cannot be stopped.

  • A new vision of AD

    A new vision of Alzheimer's disease Train general practitioners and pharmacists on Alzheimer's disease: The aim is to make them aware of the very slow progression of the disease: The Alzheimer's patient is not only a bedridden person. They would also be reminded that non-medicinal techniques are already available to slow the progression of the disease and that clinical trials are ongoing for drugs. Finally, the aim of this training would be to create a network between GPs, pharmacists and experts.

Develop

Develop your idea

Now that you have formed teams we move into the development phase (don't worry you can still create a team). If you haven’t decided on an idea, go back to the ideation and pick one. The next step is to validate your idea and develop it further. Design Thinking has a clear user-focus, you will want to learn from your users and use the insights for development. For example you can prototype your idea and test it on actual users. Development is a continuous and iterative process - improve as many times as possible, step by step. Each step doesn’t have to be a final product - it's about improvement and user fit. Share your developments (iterations) on the platform as they come along, it's a great way to document the process and get feedback. Your process will be considered in the selection of finalists.


Full instructions


Design Thinking guide

The Experience Room - X-line

Cross this line of silent ignorance, prejudices and uneasiness. Get an insight what it means to have Alzheimer’s disease - EXPERIENCE it. With help of AR (augmented reality) we will develop a room, which is adaptable to your own home. Be guided through different story-lines, full filling tasks and start feeling the different phases of Alzheimer´s disease. Due to this deeper understanding, you will be encourage to talk about it with your loved ones, sharing information and beeing more aware.

0 0

Celebrity Face of AD

Engaging a celebrity "face" to talk about AD and the advantages of not postponing seeking medical advise. as Michael J Fox for Parkinsons or Stephan Hawkins for ALS.

0 0

Social Media "yes, we care!" campaign

We need to move the younger generation into prevention modus and knowledge that we can do something about this and catching it early means better chance of not progressing. Creating awareness with the younger generation, esp. through social media as a medium.

0 0

AD Hotline

Making sure there's a source for help such as an anonymous hotline where people can call if they are concerned or need help.

3 3

Happy-AD care centers

help make AD care centers less a scary "bad place" a patient could end up because of the disease, but more seen as a protected environment for part of the community that cannot take care of themselves, eg like a child-care center. So instead of just submitting the patient, the family gets place and just as with child-care, there is a long initiation period so the patient can ease into the stay there.

0 0

Prevention tool/app

A prevention tool/app, which provides the following services: 1) longitudinal assessment of risk 2) proactive lifestyle stimulation 3) social/family network platform 4) insurance company participation 5) patient support 6) integration with OS the aim is to address the denial, stigma, fear, chronicity of disease, challenges from symptoms and dealing with aging in general.

0 0

Fun Family Challenge Game

To remove stigma by creating a "fun family challenge across generations" game, in the style of board games or on-line multi-player video games.

1 1
+1

Selection

Selection of qualified ideas

After the development phase you will have the chance to submit your final idea as a team to participate in the competition. A selection of teams will be invited to join us in Stockholm for the finals in January. We will select based on following criteria:

• At least one iteration done in the development phase
• teams of minimum 2, maximum 5 people can join
• Originality of idea and value well explained regarding solution
• Well-framed user centered problem definition (including the need) • Design Thinking - Ingenuity and iterative approach in testing the ideas & prototypes

More details to come soon.

Grand final

Grand final - The workshop days

At this workshop you will have the chance to validate your idea. An expert and patient panel will be present to give you feedback on your idea concerning all three aspects, desirability, feasibility and viability. This will help you improve your idea one last time before the final presentation. Apart from getting a digital certificate in Design Thinking and a chance for winning great prizes, one team could even have a chance for further development together with the challenge host, Roche.

More details to come soon.



More about the challenge

Alzheimer’s disease presents a high unmet medical need in a large population. As seen in studies, too many who show signs of Alzheimer’s disease, who are diagnosed with it, or even being closely related to someone of the mentioned, fall into denial.

This emotional hurdle is a true obstacle as it is shown that the earlier we intervene, the higher the probability to decrease its negative effects, co-morbidities or delay the disease and burden to the patients and/or its relatives. Thus, new ways to overcome any threshold to intervention, including denial, is crucial.

More about this project

The Stockholm EIT Health Starter Lab, represented by Karolinska Institutet’s Unit for Bioentrepreneurship and Openlab Stockholm invite you together with Roche to embark on this collaborative innovation journey. It’s ultimate goal: to crack solutions for early intervention of Alzheimer’s.

During 60 days, we’ll coach and facilitate an open innovation on this platform by using Design Thinking as method, mindset and toolset to guide the process. This innovation journey ends in a final event of two workshop days in Stockholm, where selected teams will meet to further develop their ideas with the aid of experts and patients. Apart from getting a digital certificate in Design Thinking and a chance for winning great prizes, one team could even have a chance for further development together with the challenge host, Roche.

Who can participate and how

Whether you are a student, an entrepreneur, a professional, an expert, or just someone with great interest and curiosity to take on this challenge... we welcome you all! Whether you are alone or already a team, all formations can join!

There are several ways to participate; from attending any of the live events hosted around Europe, to engaging in this online platform. Or both! Either or, we promise this will be an experience worthwhile! It’s an opportunity to make new connections and not the least to learn Design Thinking, a human-centered approach to creative problem solving. Plus, it is your chance of taking a stake in cracking this important challenge together with other curious creative doers around Europe!On this platform, you may post new ideas, build on or provide feedback to others. You may form teams to co-develop ideas further according to the design thinking methodology - all under our coaching. This is an opportunity to follow and learn from an innovation journey up to its grand finale. Who knows maybe you and your idea will be selected to join the workshop in Stockholm coming January!

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